currently happily under construction :)

Drawing with the magic frog in p5.js

drawing the magic frog in WEBGL

We can use images like we use brushes to paint a picture. This works for the p5.js WEBGL mode too. So we have three dimensions to play with.

Do not forget to upload a „froggy.png“ to your p5.js sketch folder.

let frog_img;
let w,h;

function preload(){

  frog_img = loadImage("froggy.png");

}

function setup() {
  
  createCanvas(window.innerWidth,window.innerHeight,WEBGL);
  imageMode(CENTER);
  w = width;
  h= height; 
  
  noSmooth();
  
}

function draw() {
  //background(220);
  
  push();
  
  //oscillate on all three axis
  let x = (sin(millis()*.001)*.5) * w;
  let y = (cos(millis()*.0004)*.5) * w;
  let z = (cos(millis()*.002)*.5) * w-w/2;
  // move it
  translate(x,y,z);
  
  // continously rotate
  rotate( frameCount *.01 );
  
  // make the frog flip on the x axis
  let sscl = (sin(millis()*.001)) ;
  scale(sscl,1);

  image(frog_img,0,0);
  
  pop();

}

pixelating the magic frog

Instead of drawing on the stage directly, we can use a buffer and pixelate it in general.

let frog_img;
let w,h;
let buffr;

function preload(){
  frog_img = loadImage("froggy.png");
}

function setup() {
  
  createCanvas(window.innerWidth,window.innerHeight,WEBGL);
  imageMode(CENTER);
  w = width;
  h= height; 
  buffr = createGraphics(w,h); // create a graphics buffer to play with
  noSmooth();
  
}

function draw() {
  
  // draw everything into the buffer instead of drawing it directly!
  buffr.push();
  
  //oscillate on all three axis
  let x = (sin(millis()*.001)*.5) * w*.5+ w*.5;
  let y = (cos(millis()*.0004)*.5) * w*.5+ w*.5;
  let z = (cos(millis()*.002)*.5) * w-w/2;
  
  buffr.translate(x,y,z);
  
  // continously rotate
  buffr.rotate( frameCount *.01 );
  
   let sscl = (sin(millis()*.001)) ;
  buffr.scale(sscl,1);
  
  // draw frog to buffer
  buffr.image(frog_img,0,0);
  
  buffr.pop();
  
  // change pixel Density continuouly
  let pdens = map(sin(millis()*.0003),-1,1,.05,.1    );
  pixelDensity(pdens);
   
  image(buffr,0,0);
  
}

buffer magic with the magic frog

Instead of drawing on the stage directly, we can use a buffer instead. On tops, we can feed all updates back to the buffer to archieve a pretty powerfull feeback effect. In your browser 🙂

let frog_img;
let w,h;
let buffr;

function preload(){
  frog_img = loadImage("froggy.png");
}

function setup() {
  
  createCanvas(window.innerWidth,window.innerHeight,WEBGL);
  imageMode(CENTER);
  w = width;
  h= height; 
  buffr = createGraphics(w,h); // create a graphics buffer to play with
  noSmooth();
  pixelDensity(2.4);
  
}

function draw() {
  
  // draw everything into the buffer instead of drawing it directly!
  buffr.push();
  
  //oscillate on all three axis
  let x = (sin(millis()*.001)*.5) * w*.5+ w*.5;
  let y = (cos(millis()*.0004)*.5) * w*.5+ w*.5;
  let z = (cos(millis()*.002)*.5) * w-w;
  
  buffr.translate(x,y,z);
  
  // continously rotate
  buffr.rotate( frameCount *.01 );
  
   let sscl = (sin(millis()*.001)) ;
  buffr.scale(sscl,1);
  
  // draw frog to buffer
  buffr.image(frog_img,0,0,55,55);
  
  buffr.pop();
 
  // draw buffer to stage
  image(buffr,0,0);
  
  
  // draw new stuff back to the buffer for feedback style :)
  let bx = sin(millis()*.001)*.1;
  buffr.image(buffr,bx,.2);
  
}